If we visit a traditional theatre, we’re very much used to viewing the action from a static viewpoint, with most or all of the scenes created to be viewed from the front. In this case, much of the skill of the actors, director, set designers and lighting designers involved, is to maintain our interest, even though our visual perspective doesn’t change throughout the performance. In film and TV, however, we have grown up with a very different visual language, in which our viewpoint can be changed, in some cases quite radically, during scenes. This gives directors a completely different set of tools with which to tell their story, and the viewer a far more immersive experience than that offered by a static view of the action. The ITV news interview with Boris Johnson, below, shows an example of what can be achieved when switching between three cameras.

Until fairly recently, the ability to cut quickly between camera angles meant either extensive editing in post production or using extremely costly live production equipment that was only to be found in commercial TV studios. With the rapid development of digital imaging and computer technology this has changed, meaning that live production, involving switching between multiple cameras and other media sources, has become a reality for even the most modest production environments.

For some circumstances, i.e. where you want complete creative control over the final product or where real-time capture and broadcast aren’t a consideration, post production editing is still very much the way to go. However, if you’re interested in maintaining a more spontaneous feel to recorded material, or if real-time broadcast is important, then live production is now a realistic possibility for virtually anyone.

Used to record or broadcast conferences, interviews, training sessions, product demonstrations or performances; multi camera live production can be used to engage your audience, creating visual interest and adding clarity to their viewing experience.

The video below shows a simple product-demo style video, in which I show the possibilities of using multiple cameras and other input sources.